Out of the Dead City

Out of the Dead City

by Samuel R. Delany

An unknown planet is host to a radiation barrier.

When the prince is kidnapped by a menagerie of colorful characters, the kind announces war on the unknown enemy beyond the radiation barrier.

It's with his gift and abilities that lead the colorful assembly to forge through the barrier in hopes of disarming the coming war."Out of the Dead City" was rewritten in 1968 by Samuel R.

Read the Book "Out of the Dead City" Online

To increase their scientific knowledge and study the radioactive death belt, the Empire built a new city nearer to it, Telphar. Now the Toromon Empire has air vehicles powered by tetron metal, and has tried flying them over the radioactive barrierbut something is making the engines fail. There are a lot of characters for what is a pretty short novel, and it takes a while to work out which ones are important (some come more into focus in later volumes.) Mr. Delany seems to have noticed this, at one point telling the reader to remember a name, and at another point letting us know that another character will play no further role in the story. The Lord meddles with less evolved beings by puppeteering one of them, evidently for its own amusement, while the Triple Being tries to drive it off while causing the minimum of disruption to the hosts civilizations. The being currently being possessed by The Lord of the Flames is behind the strange things happening around the radiation belt, and Jon and the other two humanoids contacted by the Triple Being must stop it.

The government of Toramon is preparing to make war against a mysterious force that lives beyond the barrier, but it has become clear to some that the real purpose behind the proposed war is tied to the economic problems and population pressures of the kingdom. The questions that drive the narrative and motivate the characters are left unanswered, and events sort of peter out inconclusively.

The attacks on its planes had been nothing compared to the final insultthe kidnapping of the Crown Prince.

It hadn't occurred to me when I re-read this back in 2007 how similarly to Dhalgren this novel begins.

The government of Toramon is preparing to make war against a mysterious force that lives beyond the barrier, but it has become clear to some that the real purpose behind the proposed war is tied to the economic problems and population pressures of the kingdom. The questions that drive the narrative and motivate the characters are left unanswered, and events sort of peter out inconclusively.

Hasta unas 26 páginas después no tenía ni idea de qué me estaba contando (mi edición tenía poco más de 100 asi que llegar hasta la 100 sin tener ni una ubicación realmente consistente es un gran fallo para mí).

It's definitely worth reading if you like classic pulp scifi.

Samuel Ray Delany, also known as "Chip," is an award-winning American science fiction author. Delany was a published science fiction author by the age of 20. He published nine well-regarded science fiction novels between 1962 and 1968, as well as several prize-winning short stories (collected in Driftglass 1971 and more recently in Aye, and Gomorrah, and other stories 2002). Delany has published several autobiographical/semi-autobiographical accounts of his life as a black, gay, and highly dyslexic writer, including his Hugo award winning autobiography, The Motion of Light in Water. In one of his non-fiction books, Times Square Red, Times Square Blue (1999), he draws on personal experience to examine the relationship between the effort to redevelop Times Square and the public sex lives of working-class men, gay and straight, in New York City.