Living Up The Street

Living Up The Street

by Gary Soto

In a prose that is so beautiful it is poetry, we see the world of growing up and going somewhere through the dust and heat of Fresno's industrial side and beyond: It is a boy's coming of age in the barrio, parochial school, attending church, public summer school, and trying to fall out of love so he can join in a Little League baseball team. His is a clarity that rings constantly through the warmth and wry reality of these sometimes humorous, sometimes tragic, always human remembrances.

  • Language: English
  • Category: Young Adult
  • Rating: 3.62
  • Pages: 176
  • Publish Date: February 1st 1992 by Laurel Leaf Library
  • Isbn10: 0440211700
  • Isbn13: 9780440211709

Read the Book "Living Up The Street" Online

The good news is that the book is still the same: powerfully descriptive and so incisive about childhood and young adulthood that however disparate our experiences were (the author was a poor Hispanic boy living in Fresno in the 1960s while I was a middle-class white girl growing up in a rural town in Wyoming in the 1980s), there was not an unfamiliar or false note in here. I loved the first story of the wild Soto children (Being Mean), but Id have a hard time sharing the episode where Gary and his brother set off to beat up some new neighborhood children (who were Okies) with sacks filled with cats. Out of all of the stories, I ended up with three that I could use: Saturday with Jackie, Bloodworth (with a few small applications of a Sharpie), and One Last Time. We walked like blind men, hands out and feeling the air(pg 79) Gary and Jackie end up stealing two mannequins from the store, and realizing they have no one to sell them to, make them fight each other- using them like clubs- until they are utterly destroyed.

This story is an autobiography about Gary Soto life, who is a Mexican-American living in Fresno, California. One of the problems that occurs in the book is that Soto runs away from home and lives on the street. I think Gary Soto wants readers to know that relationship with your family is very important.

He finally finds a place to stay by renting a room by a middle age couple My favorite part of the book was when Gary Soto had to pull down his pants to get a shot of penicillin. This story is a narrative about Gary Sotos life, who is a Mexican-American living in Fresno, California. I think Gary Soto wants readers to know that everyone should work hard to be able to be able to succeed in life.

Gary Soto lived his whole life in poverty, and we see what that means in each stage of life. Now, again, the word discrimination isn't used a lot in the book, but the idea lingers like a bad stench. Though it's nothing amazing in my opinion, I do think it's worth the read if you're interested in learning about what it means to live in poverty.

This is a book I could use in a classroom to have students read in small groups to practice their fluency. It is an easy read but students could easily become interested in it because of the stories mood and tension.

I recently read Living up the street By Gary Soto. One of the problems that occur in the book is that Soto runs away from home and lives on the streets. I think Gary Soto wants readers to know that relationship with your family is very important.

Soto started the chapter by writing, There are three springs my brother and i walked to Romain playground to try for little league. I think Gary Soto wants readers to know that everyone should work hard to be able to succeed in life. I would recommend this book to my cousins because my cousins find family life important, like Gary Soto.

I recently read living up the street by Gary Soto. this story is a narrative about Gary Sotos life, who is a Mexican-American living in Fresno, California. He also wants readers to know that life is difficult when one is poor but you can still enjoy your life .In my opinion the book,Living Up the Street, was a good book because it was funny.

Gary Soto, born April 12, 1952, was raised in Fresno, California. He divides his time between Berkeley, California and his hometown of Fresno.